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Bob Keyes

Bob Keyes has written about the arts in Maine since 2002. He’s never been much an artist himself, other than singing in junior high school chorus and acting in a few musicals. But he’s attended museums, theaters, clubs and concert halls all his life, and cites Bob Dylan as most influential artist of any kind since Picasso. He lives in Berwick.

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Posted: October 3, 2016

Mill about L-A’s arts scene

Written by: Bob Keyes
The audience-activated exhibition "Memory" by Amy Stacey Curtis continues through Oct. 28 on the fifth floor of the Bates Mill in Lewiston. Photo by Derek Davis/Staff Photographer

The audience-activated exhibition “Memory” by Amy Stacey Curtis continues through Oct. 28 on the fifth floor of the Bates Mill in Lewiston.
Photo by Derek Davis/Staff Photographer

The Maine International Conference on the Arts, happening Thursday and Friday in Lewiston and hosted by the Maine Arts Commission, gives Lewiston and Auburn a chance to show off their arts scene.

And there are plenty of arts-related happenings:

Art Crawl, 7 p.m. Thursday, beginning at the Franco Center, 46 Cedar St., Lewiston

To coincide with the conference, LA Arts is putting together an evening Art Crawl after the Thursday night opening session. The Art Crawl will include the Maine Craft Association’s 2016 Craft Apprentice Program gallery, showing at LA Arts from 4 to 7 p.m. with music from Somali and Sudanese musicians and an art walk through Lewiston until 8 p.m. Maps are available at the Franco Center. There will be snacks and drinks along the way, with exhibitions and displays.

The Craft Apprentice Program pairs master artists with apprentices to learn the craft and help sustain the craft sector. They’ve been working together much of the year, and will show the work they created. They will display their work during the conference at the Bates Mill, and it also will be at LA Arts.

The "fiber pair": Anne Emlein and Rose Allard. Photo by Sadie Bliss, Maine Crafts Association

The “fiber pair”: Anne Emlein and Rose Allard.
Photo by Sadie Bliss, Maine Crafts Association

The masters and their apprentices are Anne Emlein and Rose Allard of Portland, who machine knit contemporary fashion apparel; Linda Perrin and Jacquelyn Jenson, who sculpted in glass; and Doug Wilson and James Crawford, who worked together blacksmithing.

“Memory,” Amy Stacey Curtis, Bates Mill, 35 Canal St., Lewiston; amystaceycurtis.com

Installation artist Amy Stacey Curtis continues her ninth and final “solo biennial” on the fifth floor of the Bates Mill through Oct. 28. Her exhibition is open noon to 5 p.m. daily. When this installation closes, Curtis will have designed, constructed and installed 81 audience-activated art pieces in nine mill spaces in eight Maine communities since 2000. This one, titled “Memory,” explains how and why we remember the things we do.

“Covering the Nation: The Art of the Bates Bedspread,” Museum L-A, Bates Mill Complex, 35 Canal St., Lewiston; museumla.org

Museum L-A is dedicated to the region’s history of work and industry. For this exhibition, guest curator Jacqueline Field assembled some of the best-known and most beautiful bedspreads made in the Bates Mill. Accompanying the bedspreads are displays with advertising to promote the Bates brand. Hours are 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Thursday.

“Robert Indiana: Now and Then,” Bates College Museum of Art, Olin Arts Center, 75 Russell St., Lewiston; bates.edu/museum

The exhibition of the Maine-based pop artist features more than 70 pieces, and the centerpiece is a series of new paintings that Indiana made based on the Bob Dylan song “Like a Rolling Stone.” Indiana incorporated Dylan’s words into a series of 12 new paintings that are mostly based on Indiana’s “The American Dream” series from the early 1960s. Indiana finished the past piece of the Dylan series six weeks before the exhibition opened in June, and this is the first time they’ve been shown publicly.

 

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