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Heather Steeves

Heather Steeves tries to do things that are fun -- and only things that are fun. So far that's included stilt walking, roller derby and cross-country road trips in her Saturn.

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Posted: December 31, 2014

A few things to see at January’s art walk in Portland: Maine’s 2014 yearbook, British history and bright pastels

Written by: Heather Steeves
January, man. Maybe it’s because we’re all getting back to our feet after the one-two holiday punch of Christmas and New Years, but whatever the reason it doesn’t seem like there’s a ton of new art popping up in town for this month’s art walk. Don’t get me wrong, there are about 22 shows, but that’s a handful compared to even November and December, when artists and galleries were pushing their works out for the holiday rush. Now, we’re fully into beautiful, quiet Maine winter. Enjoy the lights around downtown Portland while they’re still up and check out one Maine retrospective and another historically important show wrapping up and leaving town:
Mist backlit by the morning sun rises through trees near Patten in this view from a height of land along Route 11 in Patten that is part of the scenic byway of Katahdin Woods & Waters. Portland Press Herald photo by Gregory Rec.

Mist backlit by the morning sun rises through trees near Patten in this view from a height of land along Route 11 in Patten that is part of the scenic byway of Katahdin Woods & Waters. Portland Press Herald photo by Gregory Rec.

Maine: 2014

Portland Public Library | 5 Monument Way | Photos

2014 was a hell of a year for Maine. The Portland Press Herald’s photo staff has seen a lot of it. They’ve roamed Baxter State Park, shot every major event in Portland, captured Mainers who surf, ski and dog sled race. For art walk, the Portland Public Library will show off the work of the newspaper’s photo staff, as a sort of look-back at Maine’s year. Disclaimer: Mainetoday Magazine and mainetoday.com are products of the Portland Press Herald. The show will still be awesome.

Works by Brenda Ferguson.

Works by Brenda Ferguson.

Benefit for Brenda

Dathan Hunter Salon | 4 Milk St. | Pastels
During a hair appointment at Dathan Hunter Salon, a client saw the art and told salon coordinator Tryce Yanok about her artist friend Brenda, who has terminal cancer. After seeing some of the bright pastels of goats, flowers and fruits, Yanok decided they would be perfect for the salon.
“She’s very sick. She might not make it through this holiday season,” Yanok said. “This money will support her daughter and Brenda’s family. She’s been through chemo and now,” Yanok paused and smacked her lips.
More than 50 of Brenda Ferguson’s works will hang in the salon for the art walk and all the proceeds will go to her family. Many of the pastels are small — 6 inches by 6 inches — and cost $100.
“We just hope to sell enough to make a difference for her,” Yanok said.
A Saddled Bay Hunter, oil on panel, 21 3/4 x 27 3/4 inches. Artist: George Stubbs (England, 1724-1806) The Berger Collection at the Denver Art Museum

A Saddled Bay Hunter, oil on panel, 21 3/4 x 27 3/4 inches. Artist: George Stubbs (England, 1724-1806) The Berger Collection at the Denver Art Museum

The British are leaving! The British are leaving!

Portland Museum of Art | 7 Congress St. | Show closes Sunday, Jan. 4. | Paintings

Last call. Portland Museum of Art’s show “Treasures of British Art 1400-2000: The Berger Collection” is packing it in soon. The museum claims that show is “the most significant private collection of British Art in the United States.” But don’t worry, history geeks, it looks like the museum will replace it with a show focusing on maritime art from 1750 to the early 1900s.

I’d highly recommend reading the Press Herald’s review first. The writer explained why a bunch of these works are important. That way you’re not meandering around the museum saying, “it just looks like a weird dude.” You can impress your friends with art-history anecdotes and tell them no no no, that the infamous wife-beheading Henry VIII as a teenager. The whole show is a blend of art and history and art-history.

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