Window to the Woods
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    Window to the Woods

    Week-long Canoe Trip | Moose, Sunrise, The Ending | Part 5

    We're on the fifth day of our remote canoe trip. Plans have us reaching our destination tomorrow morning - a boat landing where one of our two vehicles is parked. Unfortunately, it's my honeymoon and my loving wife left the keys for that vehicle at our launching point, 40 miles North. A moment of panic sets in as those words leave her lips. Read on

    Posted: November 27, 2013
  • mainetoday
    Window to the Woods

    Week-long Canoe Trip (Stranded) | Chesuncook Village | Part 4

    Coffee begins percolating over the propane flame around 4:45am. The evening had a chill that the sleeping bag simply couldn't cut. Luckily, this Coleman stove is slowly unthawing my finger tips at the picnic table. Read on

    Posted: November 19, 2013
  • mainetoday
    Window to the Woods

    Week-long Canoe Trip | Whitetail Deer & Adventure | Part 3

    Deer, Canadian geese, troves of wild blueberries and hammock relaxation greet us on day three of our canoe trip down the West Branch of the Penobscot River outside of Baxter Park. It's been over 80 hours since we last saw another human being. Read on

    Posted: November 13, 2013
  • mainetoday
    Window to the Woods

    Week-long Canoe Trip | Bald Eagles & Moose | Part 2

    The West Branch of the Penobscot is famous for its wildlife and our first day on the water proved that fact. An hour into our paddle, we were passing the flask around a corner as a moose spotted us from the muddy waterside bank. With inquisition and a hint of tameness - he stood in place - rubbernecking as our canoe made way down river. That's something to raise a toast to. Read on

    Posted: November 5, 2013
  • mainetoday
    Window to the Woods

    Week-long Canoe Trip | Penobscot River | Part I

    PART I: After debate over a tropical vacation get-a-way, I opted to purchase a canoe and spend a quiet week on Maine's historic West Branch of the Penobscot River. With a total paddle distance around 50 miles, we'd break it up evenly, fish the afternoons away and spend evenings at the remote campsites, dotted every few miles along the riverbanks. Read on

    Posted: October 29, 2013
  • mainetoday
    Window to the Woods

    Fall in New Hampshire | Hiking Mt. Major | Local Hotspots

    Afternoon temperatures dip low as we ascend the first peak of Mt. Major. The treetops, high above, sway back and forth with the early onset of winter winds. Strong steady gusts requires me to flip down the sides of my wool Stormy Kromer cap over my ears for protection. Read on

    Posted: October 24, 2013
  • mainetoday
    Window to the Woods

    Aroostook State Park | Hiking in Presque Isle | The County Outdoors

    Today I explore the Northernmost state park in the East. Aroostook State Park is located at the tip of Maine and touts the honor of being Maine's first state park (about 5 hours North of Portland). The sun rises behind a cloud-filled sky as we tighten up our packs. Read on

    Posted: October 22, 2013
  • mainetoday
    Window to the Woods

    Winter Prediction | Woolly Bear Caterpillar | Farmer's Almanac

    The Northeast may have a mild winter in store if one weather prediction method used by Old Farmer's Almanac holds true. The woolly bear caterpillar (known for their transformation inside a cocoon to a full-grown moth) is composed of 13 segments; black on either end with a reddish-brown center. Read on

    Posted: October 16, 2013
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    Window to the Woods

    Old Logging Roads | Exploring the Woods | Rangeley Camping

    I've expressed obsessions for a few things on Backwoods Plaid. One is history while another is logging. Logging in it's more primitive form is fascinating - the woodsmen took off into unexplored forests for the winter months to work in the woods, fell trees and load them onto frozen lakes. Read on

    Posted: October 9, 2013
  • mainetoday
    Window to the Woods

    Safe Drinking Water While Hiking, Canoeing & Fishing

    Safe drinking water is key to all outdoor adventures. Bacteria, giardia, salmonella, viruses and other microorganisms can be a concern when collecting drinking water from natural sources. Treatment methods are usually water filtration or boiling. Read on

    Posted: October 1, 2013